WIFW A/W 2011: Interesting looks and outfits from Day 5

On the final day of Wills Lifestyle India Fashion Week Autumn/Winter 2011, we spotted a few interesting outfits that made us sit up and take note. Here they are:

Made from safety pins

Nikhita Tandon’s on-ramp rock divas wore dresses that were embellished with safety pins, along with sequins and beads. Edgy? You decide!

Nikhita Tandon at WIFW A/W 2011- dress with safety pins Nikhita Tandon at WIFW A/W 2011- dress with safety pins closeup

 

 

Women as pirates

Models in eye patches walked down the ramps at Rahul Reddy (the designer called them “unsung warriors”). Colours were dark, with subtle hints of pink and greys. The appliqués had floral and circular motifs even as accessories like combat boots and umbrellas made an appearance.

Rahul Reddy at WIFW A/W 2011

Futuristic with elastic

At Ridzyn by Ritesh Kumar, we saw elastic being used to create 3D textures, collars and neckpieces. Combining linear silhouettes with non-traditional add-ons, the designer created a futuristic look that is much more achievable and believable than Priyanka Chopra’s red hair in Love Story 2050.

Ridzyn by Ritesh Kumar at WIFW A/W 2011 Ridzyn by Ritesh Kumar at WIFW A/W 2011

Let’s go linear

Rahul Mishra’s collection drew inspiration from lines of all kinds. Geometry showed up as diamond motifs and cuts, dots and landscapes. Using mostly black and white along with blush pinks, greys and red accents in silk and khadi, there was symmetry and asymmetry,  but it all balanced out in the final looks.

Rahul Mishra at WIFW A/W 2011

WIFW A/W 2011: Interesting looks and outfits from Day 5

On the final day of Wills Lifestyle India Fashion Week Autumn/Winter 2011, we spotted a few interesting outfits that made us sit up and take note. Here they are:

Made from safety pins

Nikhita Tandon’s on-ramp rock divas wore dresses that were embellished with safety pins, along with sequins and beads. Edgy? You decide!

Nikhita Tandon at WIFW A/W 2011- dress with safety pins Nikhita Tandon at WIFW A/W 2011- dress with safety pins closeup

 

 

Women as pirates

Models in eye patches walked down the ramps at Rahul Reddy (the designer called them “unsung warriors”). Colours were dark, with subtle hints of pink and greys. The appliqués had floral and circular motifs even as accessories like combat boots and umbrellas made an appearance.

Rahul Reddy at WIFW A/W 2011

Futuristic with elastic

At Ridzyn by Ritesh Kumar, we saw elastic being used to create 3D textures, collars and neckpieces. Combining linear silhouettes with non-traditional add-ons, the designer created a futuristic look that is much more achievable and believable than Priyanka Chopra’s red hair in Love Story 2050.

Ridzyn by Ritesh Kumar at WIFW A/W 2011 Ridzyn by Ritesh Kumar at WIFW A/W 2011

Let’s go linear

Rahul Mishra’s collection drew inspiration from lines of all kinds. Geometry showed up as diamond motifs and cuts, dots and landscapes. Using mostly black and white along with blush pinks, greys and red accents in silk and khadi, there was symmetry and asymmetry,  but it all balanced out in the final looks.

Rahul Mishra at WIFW A/W 2011

Eco Chic: Go beyond Earth Hour fashionably

It’s almost time for Earth Hour! On March 26, millions of people across the world will switch off their lights for an hour at 8.30 pm to spread the message of a low-carbon lifestyle.

Earth Hour logo Earth Hour can be a great sign of solidarity, but it’s not enough—we need to go beyond the hour, and not just save electricity, but also look at ways of living a more eco friendly life. Here are our tips for going beyond earth hour—the fashionable way.

Tip 1: Shop local.

That’s easier said than done, of course. And we all want the Made in China/ Turkey/ Morocco Zara tops and Mango dresses. Even the Made in India labelled garments at international brand stores will probably have travelled around the world and come back. But we can look for chic alternatives that are locally-made and don’t have such a long travel tale to tell. Why just clothes? You can buy Indian skin care products as well.

Tip 2: Wear eco chic.

If Colin Firth and his wife Livia Firth can wear eco-friendly red carpet outfits, why can’t we? If we look hard enough, there are eco chic clothes out there. Lots of designers are using organic materials that support local communities, so there’s a smaller carbon footprint as well. Try Ela’s dresses (available at Bombay Electric (Mumbai), Verandah (Bangalore) and Anonym (Hyderabad)).

Tip 3: Shop sensibly.

Think twice, how many yellow blouses do you really, really need? Each garment you buy later becomes wastage or throwaway once the season or trend is over. So don’t go wild at the mall; instead, think carefully before buying  and invest in some seasonless classics (like LBDs). This will also save you a bunch of money and wardrobe space.

Tip 4: Recycle.

Some beauty brands love recycling, like The Body Shop and MAC. You can give back used bottles, containers, tubes and jars to them for recycling, and maybe get some freebies in return. What could be better than that?

Tip 5: Shop at one go.

Make a list of things you want to buy and keep aside enough time to finish all your shopping in one visit. Avoid making several trips to the mall, shopping centre or street market, you’ll pollute less!

Stay chic!

Fashion News: Master of textiles Neeru Kumar to open WIFW

Designer Neeru Kumar WIFWVeteran textile designer Neeru Kumar will open Wills Lifestyle India Fashion Week (WIFW) Autumn/Winter 2011 (begins April 6).

If you haven’t heard of Neeru Kumar, you’re not the only one. Even though she has been in the industry for more than three decades, Neeru has made her mark in the world of textiles. She works with traditional Indian crafts such as kantha, khadi and ikat, creating weaves that are suited to contemporary sensibilities and can be made into wearable garments.

Her versatile fabrics are made into saris, Wills Lifestyle India Fashion Weekscarves, shawls and even home furnishing products. Neeru is known for experimenting with weaves, and her products are sold throughout the world under her eponymous label.

No designer profile is complete with some name-dropping, so we might as well tell you that Neeru Kumar’s client list includes Sonia Gandhi, Shabana Azmi and Arundhati Roy.

There aren’t too many fashion designers in India who go beyond mere lip service to India’s crafts and textile traditions. And that’s exactly why we’re looking forward to Neeru Kumar’s show early next month!

What should I wear: sari or dress? Or both?

 

Priyanka Chopra in Louis Vuitton on cover of Vogue India November 2010

If you think Priyanka Chopra’s wearing a sari made into a dress on the cover of Vogue India, you’re not the only one. The big hoarding on Mumbai’s Peddar Road had me convinced the smart fashionistas at Vogue India had tailored a sari into a dress for the actor. Turns out that the corset-and-skirt are from Louis Vuitton’s India-inspired capsule collection. Another dress from the collection below:

Louis Vuitton sari dress

The pictures I saw got me umm… excited, to say the least. I got thinking on which of my Mom’s saris I would like to make into another garment, and drew up a wishlist:

  • Brocade sari: Dress (but not a sheath—it’s overdone), flared dress (that can double up as a kurta to wear with churidar), or mini skirt
  • Chiffon sari: Loose tunic or layered dress/ jacket (like Nachiket Barve often does)
  • Net sari: Loose-fitting blouse
  • Sequinned sari: Sexy party dress
  • Lace sari: Blouse or waistcoat (to be worn over a solid tee/ shirt)

 

Which sari would you tailor into another garment? Tell us!

LFW: Nachiket’s mix-and-match dazzles

Nachiket Barve got the idea for his Lakme Fashion Week Winter/Festive 2010 Magpie collection from the bird that steals shiny objects to decorate its nest. The designer “stole” inspiration from around the world, drawing inspiration from objects as varied as fabergé eggs, Moroccan star motifs, Marrakech’s tropical sunsets and Ukrainian paintings.

In true Nachiket style, there was plenty of colour (burgundy, turquoise, purple, ink blue and more) with relaxed, yet structured, silhouettes. The designer expertly combined various techniques in a single garment, such as cross stitch beading with silk and glass beads and 3D appliqué on graphic resist origami dyed dress.

Nachiket Barve cross stitch purple dress Nachiket Barve wrap dress LFW

Nachiket experimented with churidars, kurtas and saris for the first time, with interesting results. For instance, there were couple of tie-and-dye saris with appliqué borders. Also seen was the use of clever layering in contrasting colours.

Nachiket Barve sari LFW

Speaking Chic says: A fun, delightful and wearable collection, with several garments worth keeping for several seasons.